2021 in Review – and My First Handspun Pattern!

Happy New Year!

I took some time off during the holidays to be with family, and since coming back I’ve been doing the work of closing out 2021 and planning for the upcoming year. In 2021, I published 6 new patterns and 15 blog posts, and taught my first ever online class! Teaching the class on breed-specific yarns was one of the highlights of the year for me, and I hope to do more teaching in the future – maybe even in person.

This year I have some new designs planned, of course, but I am also focusing on updating some old favorites. I’ve mentioned before in my newsletter or on Instagram that I want to update the Suora tee pattern to include larger sizes, and will hopefully be testing and releasing that in the coming months.

A cream-colored, handknit cabled hat rests on a wood surface next to an evergreen bough and pine cone.
The Towline Hat. Photo by Matt Graves for Spin Off Magazine

I’ve become confident enough in my spinning now to begin designing patterns from my handspun, and my first effort, the Towline Hat, was published as a subscriber exclusive on the Spin Off website just before New Year’s. If you follow me on Instagram you will have seen a teaser there. It’s a cozy, squishy cabled hat knit in woolen-spun 3-ply yarn. (Spin Off subscribers can find the pattern here.) The pattern features Tunis lambswool fiber from Tarheelbilly Farm (she has just updated her shop with both fiber and yarn, so do have a look).

I will be publishing this as a downloadable pattern once this exclusivity period ends, and it will include a commercial yarn version for those who don’t want to spin their own.


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An image of handknit items with the words 'Fasten Off YAL Designer; Nov 30th-Dec 31st' overlaid.

Fasten Off Yarnalong – 25% off Patterns with Code

As the holidays approach, holiday sales are something everyone looks forward to. I will not be holding a Black Friday sale – the ethos of Black Friday doesn’t fit with my values as a business around sustainability. I don’t want you to buy my patterns just because they’re on sale. However, I will be participating in the Fasten Off Yarnalong again this year.

The yarnalong runs from November 30th through December 31st. It will take place entirely off Ravelry, as Ravelry has still not fully fixed their accessibility issues and doesn’t seem to have any intention of doing so. There are several ways to participate – you can join the Discord server for the event, or participate on Instagram or Twitter using the hashtag #FastenOffYAL. You can find all the details on the Fasten Off website.

As part of the event all individual patterns in my shop are 25% off with code FO2021 from November 30th – December 6th. The code is good for my patterns on Payhip, Etsy, and yes, Ravelry – I don’t want to penalize anyone for using Ravelry, but I also want to support an event in which everyone can participate.

A word on accessibilty of my patterns:

While I don’t yet offer screen reader or low vision accessible versions of my patterns, I have been working to make my patterns more accessible. My new patterns going forward use symbols or grayscale in charts for color blind accessibility, include both charts and written instructions in most cases, and limit the use of abbreviations. If you have any questions about my patterns, please reach out using the contact form or email me at kerry@bullockozkandesigns.com.


Subscribe to my Monthly Musings newsletter and receive a free cowl pattern! When you subscribe you will receive a free download of my Diagonal Rib Cowl. You’ll also be the first to hear about new releases and other fiber-related news.

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A red-haired model poses next to a plant wearing a colorblock cardigan in shades of gray with contrasting gold stripe.

New Fall Knitting Patterns

I’m delighted to have three new fall patterns just released as part of the Valley Yarns Designer Series. I designed these around the theme of Fall on Campus, with an eye on creating easy wardrobe pieces you’ll turn to again and again.

The first pattern is the Campus Cardigan (pictured above) – a modern take on the classic v-neck cardigan featuring a relaxed fit with straight shaping, colorblocking, and set-in pockets. Knit in Valley Yarns Northampton, this cardigan is sure to become a wardrobe staple.

The cardigan is knit in one piece from hem to underarm, then back and fronts are worked separately and joined with a 3-needle bind off. Sleeves are knit flat and seamed. The pattern is available as an individual download or a kit, and the finished chest size ranges from 34 – 66 inches with a suggested ease of 4-6 inches; see this post for my suggestions on choosing a sweater size.

The second pattern in the collection is a pair of Fair Isle mittens, also in Valley Yarns Northampton. The Snowbound mittens feature a long ribbed cuff to keep the snow out, and integrated thumb gusset. The colorwork motif occurs after the thumb shaping and uses only two colors, making it a perfect first Fair Isle project. The mittens can also be purchased as a kit, and the pattern is written for 3 sizes, so you can make a pair for the whole family.

A red-haired model poses wearing a pair of blue and gold Fair Isle mittens.
Photo courtesy of WEBS

Last but not least, you’ll need a cozy hat and cowl to go with those mittens, and what better way to add a pop of color and texture to your winter clothes. The Golden Hour hat and cowl feature squishy cables in Valley Yarns Valley Superwash DK. The hat is written for two sizes, the cowl for one generous size, and a kit is also available for this pattern.

A red-haired model poses wearing a gold cabled hat with foldover brim and matching cabled cowl.
Photo courtesy of WEBS

Subscribe to my Monthly Musings newsletter and receive a free cowl pattern! When you subscribe you will receive a free download of my Diagonal Rib Cowl. You’ll also be the first to hear about new releases and other fiber-related news.

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The author's feet, crossed and wearing gray wool cabled socks, rest on a brick staircase.

Jacob Wool Hiking Socks

I’ve just finished my latest knitting project – a pair of socks knitted in local wool. The yarn is from Avillion Farm – I’ve previously knitted two sweaters from her lovely Jacob and Shetland flock, and almost two years ago I bought a skein of her (then) new Jacob/ mohair sock yarn. The yarn is roughly a sport weight, so I thought it would make lovely hiking socks. And since I don’t wear my hiking socks daily, I knew I wouldn’t mind handwashing these socks.

I used a pattern from the book In the Footsteps of Sheep by Debbie Zawinski (Schoolhouse Press, 2015). The book is an account of her walking journey around Scotland in search of each region’s iconic sheep breeds, and each pattern designed for one of the breeds has a story behind it. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and wanted to make a sock from one of the patterns, so this seemed like a perfect match. The socks I chose, Andrew’s Scottish Blackface Shepherd’s Socks, have a double-thickness heel, perfect for wearing in hiking boots, and a staghorn cable running up the side. They are designed for worsted-weight yarn and a man’s foot, so using the thinner yarn and smaller 2.5mm (US 1.5) needles worked out perfectly. I did try a couple of different needle sizes before I found the one that worked.

I’m very pleased with the finished result and I can’t wait to wear them with my new hiking boots.


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Picking Up Stitches for an Afterthought Thumb

The March Flowers Mittens pattern uses an afterthought thumb – similar to an afterthought heel on a sock – to avoid interrupting the colorwork on the mitt and provide an easy, neat finish. The downside of this, of course, is that it doesn’t fit as well as a mitt with a thumb gusset. However, I envisioned these mitts as a perfect quick knit to throw on during those chilly spring morning and then tuck in your pocket when it warms up. The afterthought thumb suits my purposes perfectly.

It can be a bit tricky to pick up the stitches neatly once you’ve removed the waste yarn, so I prefer to do it while the waste yarn is still in place. In the photo below I’ve placed the stitches on the two tips of my circular needle, and you can see the blue waste yarn there in between.

Photo shows the palm of a fingerless mitt with two rows of stitches picked up around with waste yarn in place.
Picking up the thumb stitches with waste yarn in place.

When you go to pick up the stitches, you need to pay attention to three rows of stitches: on the bottom you have a row of stitches where the top of the ‘v’ meets the waste yarn; in the middle the row made by the waste yarn, which will be removed in the next step; and on top a row of stitches where the bottom of the ‘v’ meets the waste yarn. To pick up the stitches, keep the mitt facing up, and insert a needle tip (or double’pointed needle) into the right leg of the ‘v’ in the row above and below the waste yarn. You can then safely unravel the waste yarn (if you are using a long circular needle shifting the stitches onto the cable will make this easier), and you will be left with live stitches on the needles.

The other tricky thing about the thumb is picking up the stitch in the gap on either side so that you get a neat finish. Since I’m working the thumb in the main color, I created my stitch by picking up a bar of the main color along the edge of the gap and knitting through the back loop. Here you can see the tip of the needle has been inserted into the green bar that will be picked up.

The palm side of a fingerless mitt with thumb stitches on the needles. The needle tip points to the stitch to be picked up in the gap.
Picking up a stitch in the gap.

I hope this tip helps, and please tag your projects #MarchFlowersMitts and #BullockOzkanDesigns. I love to see your creations!


Subscribe to my Monthly Musings newsletter and receive a free cowl pattern! When you subscribe you will receive a free download of my Diagonal Rib Cowl. You’ll also be the first to hear about new releases and other fiber-related news.

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