Spinning Gotland Wool and Some Natural Dyeing

I’ve been busy with some deadline knitting, so I haven’t posted in awhile. Which means I have a few new things to share.

Spinning-wise, I’ve been sampling some of the fibers that I bought at SAFF this year. The first one I decided to try was the Gotland wool fibers. I had purchased both roving and combed top, and I tried spinning the roving first – that’s the lighter gray one in the middle of the picture. I spun a 2-ply, as usual, using my best approximation of a woolen draw; this one was about 16 wpi.

Next came the darker gray combed top. I spun that to my usual fine(ish) 2-ply at ~15 wpi and also to a heavier ~10 wpi to see how that would feel. The swatch shown is knitted with the finer version. I didn’t love the heavier yarn – I think a garment with that yarn would feel too heavy.

A side note on my technique: I haven’t been trying to choose the amount of  twist I add ahead of time, but just going by what feels right when I’m spinning.

All in all I’m not sure I love the feel of spinning with a longwool, but I am quite fascinated with the Gotland. It has almost no give or springiness, unlike most wools I’ve encountered thus far. Even my Navajo-Churro fiber had some give. The finished yarn looks like it will be rough, but it has a silky feeling to it. I’m not a lover of yarns with a lot of halo, but if you like fibers like mohair this is definitely one to try. I also love the range of grays that I’ve found in Gotland – both of my samples are be cooler, silvery grays, whereas the Jacob and Finn I’ve found are warmer, beige-y grays (which I also love).

I’ve also been doing some natural dye experiments on my handspun Corriedale. My first attempt at dyeing with pokeberries, which I had found in the back of a parking lot, didn’t go well at all. I used the recipe from the book Harvesting Color by Rebecca Burgess, and I think I heated the dyepot too much. The yarn turned a pale pink color and then lost all its color. I then found another spot where I could harvest more pokeberries – the bushes were still producing into October this year – and I tried using a room-temperature vinegar dyebath. That produced the intense color I expected. As I understand it, this pokeberries aren’t very lightfast, so I don’t know how long this will last.

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Corriedale wool dyed with (L-R): pokeberries, lichen (acid and alkali baths), weld with alum mordant, and weld with alum mordant + iron afterbath

I’ve also tried dyeing with foraged lichen from my yard, and with dried weld, which I purchased from Echoview Fiber Mill. The lichen I tried with both acid and alkaline dyebaths, and didn’t see much difference. With the weld I tried with and without an iron aftermordant (I used an alum mordant on both). I also purchased some madder from Echoview, and I plan to use the rest of the Corriedale I have to see how many shades I can get from the madder using different mordants and modifiers.

Last but not least, I’ve spun up an ounce of the dyed BFL that I acquired at SAFF. And I even taught my brother to spin a bit with it!

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Introducing the Rionnag Hat

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When I designed the Rionnag Cowl, I didn’t intend to create a set. But after knitting the second sample in the smaller size, I decided I wasn’t quite done with that colorway. I may love the blue and yellow combination even more than the original colorway. So, I decided it needed a hat to go with it. A beanie with just a bit of slouch. And so, without further ado, I give you the Rionnag Hat. The pattern is now live in my Ravelry store, and you can purchase it separately or as a bundle with the Rionnag Cowl. (If you’ve previously purchased the cowl, you will automatically receive the discounted price for the hat.)

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Spinning Adventures, Part 2

Since my last post about spinning I’ve finished a couple of small projects. The first is a fingering weight Icelandic 2-ply. I’m really happy with how this turned out – it’s soft and light with a beautiful halo. I’m not sure what I’ll use this for yet. If I can get more of this fiber to spin, it would make a really nice lace shawl, and I might try dyeing it too.

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My current project is with the Navajo-Churro I showed in Part 1. I decided to try spinning this fiber for weaving on my table loom. I have natural light and dark colored roving in this breed, so I decided to spin half of the light color into a 2-ply to use as warp yarn. The rest of the lighter color and the dark I will spin as a thicker single for the weft, and weave a small 2-color table rug. That’s the plan, anyway. I’ll keep you posted how it turns out.

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I’ve also finished sampling the other fiber I had in my stash. First up was the CVM/ Romeldale from Rising Meadow Farms. This fiber makes a very squishy, bouncy yarn with a slightly fuzzier texture than other wools I’ve encountered. I’ve knitted a shawl from Clara Yarns CVM/ Romeldale, and it had a similar texture. I’m honestly not sure I like it.

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The latest sampling I did was of some Cormo combed top from Heelside Farms. I’m not sure I’m practiced enough at worsted vs. woolen spinning on the drop spindle to call this a true worsted yarn, but it is noticeably smoother and shinier despite the bounciness of the Cormo fleece. This would make a lovely squishy yarn. I’m tempted to make up a bunch of mini-skeins and dye them.

 


Spinning Adventures

Last year I started learning to spin on a drop spindle. I’m interested in learning about¬† different sheep breeds and their wool, and I think the best way to learn is to get my hands in the fiber and spin it. I’ve amassed several different types of single-breed roving and, since I recently purchased a lovely new drop spindle,¬† I decided to try spinning some of them. Most of the fiber was purchased at the Carolina Fiber Fest this Spring.

First up, some Icelandic fleece roving from Heelside Farms (http://www.heelsidefarms.com). That’s the one with the swatch on the left. I can’t believe how beautifully this turned out. I was able to spin it very fine and create a 2-ply fingering weight yarn (~20 wpi) that is next-to-skin soft. Look at that beautiful halo! This is begging to be a baby garment or a fine lace shawl. I just need to get some more of it – I only bought a 2 oz bag to try it out.

Next up was Navajo-Churro roving that I purchased in 2 natural colors from Stoney Mountain Fiber Farm (http://www.stoneymountainfarm.com/) on last years Piedmont Farm Tour. The sample of the lighter color is on the far right above. This stuff is pretty coarse and has a fairly long staple. After spinning a 2-ply sample I decided that this would make a nice weaving yarn and so I will probably try spinning some warp 2-ply and singles for weft for my table loom. I think I’ll try weaving some small table decorations.

Third, I spun up some Finn sheep roving, in the middle of the photo, also from Heelside Farms. I have fallen in love with Tuku Wool yarn (see my Rionnag Cowl design), which is made from a blend of Finn sheep, and I love this natural light gray color. I spun it into a 2-ply sport weight yarn (~16 wpi). I’m not sure this is the best use for this particular fleece, so I don’t know what I’ll make out of it. Probably some further sampling is in order. It’s fairly soft, though, and would make nice garments or accessories.

I also recently finished my first spinning project, from about 4oz of two-color Jacob fleece acquired from Humbug Farm (http://www.humbugfarm.com/Index.html) at another farm’s festival. I separated the two colors and spun them separately, then plied them together for a marled yarn. I’m pretty happy with how it turned out, and I gifted it to my brother for his birthday.

Jacob yarn

 

More to come. I still have several fibers to sample, including some CVM/ Romeldale and Cormo combed top to try out.